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Title 1- Mrs. S. Stebbins

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In case you missed my handout at Open House, I’ll attach it to the bottom of my page! Definitely check out the helpful homework hints. These are just a few ideas to help your child feel more successful.

There a lot of different activities that you can do at home to help your child/children strengthen their math, reading, and writing skills. Down below, I listed several activities that can be found on the pbs.org website that could be a fun addition to your daily routines.

Scrubbing Bubbles” This activity gives children the opportunity to read common house-hold item labels. It also gives them exposure to larger vocabulary words and a chance to learn what they mean.

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/reading-language/reading-activities/reading-activities-at-home/

As an extension of this activity, you could read other labels around the house during every-day chores. (While doing laundry, read the soap and dryer sheet containers. While preparing dinner, read the food boxes and cans.) The possibilities are endless!

“Family Recipe.” Using paper and crayons, this activity gives children the opportunity to draw a recipe card for a common meal (a peanut butter and jelly sandwich for example). Not only can they practice writing, but they are also learning what description is and how to use it. This also provides students with an opportunity to practice placing events in sequential order.

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/reading-language/reading-activities/reading-activities-at-mealtime/

For older students, they could be responsible for writing the whole step out in a complete sentence. Make sure to check for capitalization and punctuation at the end of each sentence. For even older students, have them use a thesaurus in order to enhance their vocabulary. (For example, instead of writing “Next, spread the peanut butter on one piece of bread”, they could say “Next, coat” or “smear one piece of bread with peanut butter”.)

The link down below is for more ways to incorporate reading into your time at home. There are activities for reading while watching TV, riding in the car, grocery shopping, and more!

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/reading-language/reading-activities/

Like reading and writing, math can also be incorporated into daily activities, chores, and outings. The link below is for a game called “Grocery Store BINGO”.

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/math/activities/first-second-grade/grocery-store-bingo/

To help build/enhance estimation, measuring, and graphing skills, “Pumpkin Math” a great fall activity. It can be simplified for the younger students and bumped up for the older students. For example, where a younger student may explain/predict things out loud, an older student might practice writing down explanations and predictions.

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/math/activities/first-second-grade/pumpkin-math/

To accompany all of these activity links, I also included three additional links full of helpful tips for creating enthusiasm and a feeling of success with regards to math, reading, and writing. Any type of extra exposure and practice that students receive at home will benefit them and help strengthen these areas. The stronger students are in these areas, the more successful they will feel!

I hope you find these links useful and I hope some of these activities can become a fun part of your day with your child/children. J

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/reading-language/reading-tips/

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/math/math-tips-for-parents/

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/reading-language/creative-writing/


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Welcome back everybody! This year is going to be full of challenges, changes, and excitement. It can be tough getting back into the swing of things at the start of a new school year. Similarly, students might find it difficult to adjust to new schedules, may be nervous about connecting with old friends, and could be anxious about meeting new people.

The PBS kids website gives a lot of great tips for getting your child/children ready for the school year! The links below will direct you to the following articles: “Back to School: Transitioning Your Family From Summer to School”, “Back-to-School Tips for Parents”, and “How to Beat the Back-to-School Blues”. These are just a few of the articles that the website offers in an attempt to make parents and students excited for the beginning of a new school year.

 

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/going-to-school/back-to-school/transition/

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/going-to-school/back-to-school/back-to-school-tips-for-parents/

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/going-to-school/back-to-school/back-to-school-blues/

Establishing a homework routine at home can help students feel successful and relieve unwanted stress! The link down below is for an article titled “Two Ws and an H: Establishing a Homework Routine”. This can be a helpful resource for establishing those routines during the first few weeks of school.

https://www.additudemag.com/homework-routines/

I hope everyone has a great first few weeks of school and I hope that these resources are useful. I look forward to meeting with new students, reconnecting with returning students, and reaching out to parents as the school year gets underway!

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Sam Stebbins,
Sep 13, 2017, 8:33 AM